SOLVING THE CHALLENGE OF MASTER DATA MANAGEMENT

We’ve all chuckled about the recent commercial that the advertising geniuses have come up with for Staples, the office supply giant. You know the “Dave?”, “David?”, “Hi Dave”, “Mr. Dave” commercial. Well there’s a kernel of truth behind this humorous exchange, and not only within large organizations. Many health information exchanges these days are facing the same challenge—they’re having a hard time finding who, exactly, this Dave person is. There are many reasons why, from nicknames to misunderstandings and accents to careless data entry and typos.

When you are looking at bringing together many different disparate systems, each containing a unique data set, how will all of these systems be connected together? How will they communicate, work together to give the end-user the information he or she needs? Most of all, how can you be sure that the information that’s finally presented is the correct information? Saying “Hi” to Dave also means finding the right Dave. Master data management is the toolset that organizations, including HIEs, use to find the right Dave with a high degree of confidence. At Staples, this can mean the difference between an angry customer and a sale; for an HIE, it can literally mean life and death.

In collaboration with Audacious Inquiry, Maryland’s CRISP team sought to find a solution to bring together Maryland’s hospital systems to create a central point capable of providing a 360 degree view of patients across the state. As with any organization working with critical, protected health data, CRISP’s objective was to minimize the false positive (guessing the wrong Dave, and delivering that person’s health information to a doctor) and allow for the right patient to be found, each and every time.

Click here to read about CRISP, the solution they sought and the challenges they overcame, with AI’s help, to put together an MDM solution that worked for them.

Yes, and riding on the coattail of another great slogan that sums up the implementation process…

“That was easy!”